Archiprix Chile
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Closing event in constructed structure
Closing event in constructed structure

Study of possible sites for intervention
Study of possible sites for intervention

11 volunteers, 8 days of prefabrication, 5 days of assembly and 8 days of work
11 volunteers, 8 days of prefabrication, 5 days of assembly and 8 days of work

Chusquea culeou (local bamboo variety), 90—120 cm long and 2 cm diameter
Chusquea culeou (local bamboo variety), 90—120 cm long and 2 cm diameter

Cultural activities to encourage community encounter
Cultural activities to encourage community encounter

Permanent pavements constructed by interested neighbours
Permanent pavements constructed by interested neighbours

Temporary installation in public space
Temporary installation in public space




ÍNDICE DE PROYECTOS
 
MICRO-URBAN OPERATIONS
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile PUCC
ARCHITECTURE,URBAN DESIGN

A stage in Panquehue, Aconcagua Valley, Chile.
The project experiments with collaborative practices between the school of architecture and society in a tangible way. This end-of-career project addresess contemporary issues by acting as an active agent of social transformation. The subject of investigation is the process of urban regeneration through a tactic of intervention, possibly to be addressed within the school of architecture. The project is a ‘wake-up call’, a tactic to encourage the improvement of abandoned public spaces on the city’s periphery. The intervention uses a micro-operation that works with available resources as a way to support temporary cultural activities. Temporary use involves and gathers the community, and is a tool to test possible public equipment that is scarce in the locality. The result of the enterprise was a serialized but handmade temporary intervention in Villa Lo Campo, in the fifth region of Valparaiso, Chile. The cylinder is nine metres in diameter and seven metres tall, and is structured through the tensegrity principle, made of local ‘chusquea culeou’ bamboo and rope. It consists of a temporary platform with cultural agenda that hosted various events for five weeks and was financed by local businesses at ten US dollars per square metre. It was constructed by a team of volunteers and architecture students. It also included the construction of some permanent elements, pavements mainly, by the community, which announced the regeneration of the abandoned terrain. ‘A Stage in Panquehue’ accomplished two main objectives. First, it motivated the community to become active in regenerating its own environment. Second, the end-of-career project had an impact that went beyond academic boundaries. It proved possible to successfully operate with small-scale interventions over available terrains in the city, thereby encouraging community appropriation and regeneration.